Fall 2008
Features at Wine & Spirits

Departments
Editor's Note

Happenings

Introduction to the Best
   in Wine 2008

The Best in Wine 2008
New Packaging

Emerging Wine Regions

Escape to Vineland, USA

Best New American
   Wineries

Best Winery
   Cooperatives

Rediscovered Varieties

Best New Menu Icons

Best New American
   Vineyards

Best YouTube Sightings



Wine revolutionaries
Who are the agents of change in wine? We polled leaders throughout the industry to find out whom they believe to be driving the most revolutionary changes in wine. Then we narrowed the list to ten, whether as individuals, teams or parties to a movement. These are people whose work has been seminal in recreating wine as we know it. In a number of instances, the character or nature of their work is controversial, but the impact of their work is undeniable. For more on these wine revolutionaries, check out the videos devour.tv filmed for us on location at Terroir in New York. In one, Gary Vaynerchuk interviews Paul Grieco; in another, Grieco interviews Vaynerchuk. You'll find them at wineandspiritsmagazine.com.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

Natural Wine Leaders
Many of the most vocal rebels in the wine world today are promoting their wines as "natural." It's a positive trend in the context of other issues of the moment-global warming, rising oil prices, falling water supplies, contaminated foodstuffs and pollution from chemical farming. Most leaders in the natural wine movement can agree about what they are working against. But there is no universal definition of what they are working toward: What make a wine natural? The French invented bureaucracy, so it's no surprise that vin naturel actually has a meaning in France. Alice Feiring profiles some of the leaders who agree with the meaning (non-sulfured wine) and others who move in their own natural directions.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

Innovations in Wine Retail
In the past decade, two major waves of innovation have pulled wine out of the glass cases of carriage trade shops. New retailers not only often emphasize better pricing and selection, but are also using the Internet to build community. Here are a few key innovations.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

Iberia at the Center of the Wine World
Victor de la Serna, a journalist who makes wine at Finca Sandoval in Manchuela, likes to eat at Asturianos for the fabanas and the company of the brothers Fernández, who run the bar with their mother. When he takes a foreign journalist out for tapas in Madrid, he must get a little pleasure seeing their reaction to the chalkboard, listing Niepoort Redoma white by the glass or Pintas, a red from the Douro. Portuguese wines in Spain? (The brothers, it turns out, import them.)

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

Best New Vineyards
When it comes to growing great wine, it's hard to compete with gnarly old vines eking out a few intensely flavorful grapes. But once in a while, a vineyard gets planted that shows its greatness with the first few crops. We combed through our tasting data to find the vineyards planted within the last ten years that performed best. Some are exclusive to certain wineries; others supply grapes to several vintners. All are already turning out exceptional wines.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

The Back Label
Amid all the consolidation of wine importers and distributors that we've seen in the past few years, a new generation of small importers has emerged, one that's focused particularly on small-production, low-intervention wines. Here are some of the best new names to look for on the back label.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.

Bartending in the Neoclassical Age
Seven hundred-odd years ago, intellectual Europe was consumed by a bitter debate over the texts of pre-Christian authors. On one side you had the modernists, who focused on contemporary cultural traditions of the church. If ancient texts were useful at all, they were viewed as allegories to foster their own beliefs. (Rome's great poet Virgil, for example, was appreciated chiefly as a sorcerer whose works foretold the coming of Christ.) On the other side, you had the radicals, for whom anything ancient was de facto better than anything modern. As far as they were concerned, culture ended with the fall of the Roman Empire; medieval traditions were irrelevant and just plain wrong.

The complete article is available in the print edition of Wine & Spirits.